SEO - Search Engine Optimization

There’s No Such Thing as a Site Migration

Last Updated: April 26, 2017

Posted by jonoaldersonWebsites, like the businesses who operate them, are often deceptively complicated machines. They’re fragile systems, and changing or replacing any one of the parts can easily affect (or even break) the whole setup — often in ways not immediately obvious to stakeholders or developers. Even seemingly simple sites are often powered by complex technology, like content management systems, databases, and templating engines. There’s much more going on behind the scenes — technically and organizationally — than you can easily observe by crawling a site or viewing the source code. When you change a website and remove or add elements, it’s not uncommon to introduce new errors, flaws, or faults. That’s why I get extremely nervous whenever I hear a client or business announce that they’re intending to undergo a “site migration.” Chances are, and experience suggests, that something’s going to go wrong. Ouch. #ecomchat #seo pic.twitter.com/flgncLVJBT— Mark Cook (@thetafferboy) February 26, 2017 http://platform.twitter.com/widgets.js Migrations vary wildly in scope As an SEO consultant and practitioner, I’ve been involved in more “site migrations” than I can remember or count — for charities, startups, international e-commerce sites, and even global household brands. Every one has been uniquely challenging and stressful. In each case, the businesses involved have underestimated (and in some cases, increased) the complexity, the risk, and the details involved in successfully executing their “migration.” As a result, many of these projects negatively impacted performance and potential in ways that could have been easily avoided. This isn’t a case of the scope of the “migration” being too big, but rather, a misalignment of understanding, objectives, methods, and priorities, resulting in stakeholders working on entirely different scopes. The migrations I’ve experienced have varied from simple domain transfers to complete overhauls of server infrastructure, content management frameworks, templates, and pages — sometimes even scaling up to include the consolidation (or fragmentation) of multiple websites and brands. In the minds of each organization, however, these have all been “migration” projects despite their significantly varying (and poorly defined) scopes. In each case, the definition and understanding of the word “migration” has varied wildly. We suck at definitions As an industry, we’re used to struggling with labels. We’re still not sure if we’re SEOs, inbound marketers, digital marketers, or just… marketers. The problem is that, when we speak to each other (and those outside of our industry), these words can carry different meaning and expectations. Even amongst ourselves, a conversation between two digital marketers, analysts, or SEOs about their fields of expertise is likely to reveal that they have surprisingly different definitions of their roles, responsibilities, and remits. To them, words like “content” or “platform” might mean different things. In the same way, “site migrations”…

Source: There’s No Such Thing as a Site Migration

About the author / 

S K Routray

S K Routray is a computer science graduate and Co founder at Gracioustech.com. He worked as a Online Marketing lead at many MNC Companies. He has passion for writing on SEO techniques, Social Media Marketing and digital marketing techniques. If he wasn’t an online marketer, he'd take his love for food and become a great chef cum hotel entrepreneur. Join NAS Writers team to write for NAS.

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